3D By Dan Shelley
A WAY TO MAKE
STEREO CARDS

Here are the illustrated steps that I took to make the
stereo cards I exchanged in the 10th APEC
exchange presented in the form of instructions:

(Click on the thumbnail images to see larger versions.)

NOTE: This set of instructions assumes you already have 3.5 inch by 7 inch cards made of Acid Free Matte Board or other card stock. A local hobby shop, or printing company can make these for you if you do not have matte cutting equipment. I had a set of 400 cards made up at a local printer for about 10 cents a piece.

  1. First, gather information about the image, or the subject of your image to include on the back of the stereo card. You might consider adding a reference photo(s) if appropriate. I have found the Web to be a very valuable resource for this step.

  2. Format and print the pages to be printed for the back of the cards. (At this point I also take a portion of the information from the back and make the "name" strip that will go on the front in the last steps. You could also make a full sheet front to put on the front face fo the card before the pictures instead of the strip I added in this example.)

  3. Using an archival (acid free) glue stick, completely cover the back of a card with glue. (With another sheet of paper under it to protect the work surface in case you slip off the card...)

  4. Holding the card and a sheet with the back of the card information on it up to a light, align them by sight and join them.

  5. Put the card and sheet front face down and make any small adjustments you might like to make before the glue totally sets up.

  6. Place a blank sheet of paper over the whole thing so you can use your fingers laid partially flat to smooth the whole thing, eliminating any air pockets, and ensuring a good bond.

  7. Place the card under a catalog or something else heavy for about 10 minutes to let the glue "set up" while keeping the newly glued paper from causing the card to curl. (You can keep repeating steps 3 to 7 for the rest of the cards at this point.)

  8. When all the cards have backs attached, use a pair of good, sharp scissors to trim the paper to the edge of the straight sides of the cards.

  9. Then use a corner rounder to cut the corner of the paper off along with a bit of the cards to make sure the rounded corners are equal and even.

  10. Trim the left and right chips/pictures so that they create the desired window. (I usually have a few extra pairs printed to allow me to try a variety of stereo window options, then I choose the one I like best to reproduce on the exchange cards.)

  11. Trim all of the left chips to match the left chip from the set with the correct window determined in step 10. Stack these in one pile.

  12. Trim all of the right chips to match the right chip from the set with the correct window determined in step 10. Stack these in one pile

  13. Cutting from the back of the prints to the front, trim the rounded top corners on all the left chips, and stack them again.

  14. Cutting from the back of the prints to the front, trim the rounded top corners on all the right chips, and stack them again.

  15. Using pre-made marks on a ruler to deliniate equal spacing just off center, mark matching points in the middle of the fronts of the cards to use as alignment guides.

  16. Using the glue stick, glue the area where the two chips will be placed.

  17. Quickly place the left chip essentially where it will stay, then the right chip. Small modifications in positioning can be made at this point as the glue does not "set up" right away. BUT, you don't have A LOT of time, so don't wait to long to move them around.

  18. Place the back, chips facing up, on the table, cover with a sheet of paper, and you can use your fingers laid partially flat to smooth the whole thing, eliminating any air pockets, and ensuring a good bond. This is the same as the process for the backs of the cards. (Don't move the paper once you have placed it down to ensure that glue does not get transferred to the front of the image chips.)

  19. Place the card under a catalog or something else heavy for about 10 minutes to let the glue "set up" while keeping the newly glued chips from causing the card to curl. (You can keep repeating steps 16 to 19 for the rest of the cards at this point.)

  20. Using a piece of paper to protect the chips on the front of the card, glue the area below the prints and place the name strip in place.

  21. Sign and sequentially number the cards. (1/30, 2/30...)

  22. Place the views in protective sleeves which can obtained from Light Impressions.

  23. Mail the finished views to the view re-distributor and wait with much anticipation for my package of new views to return and join the rest of my collection.


A finished Stereo View for the 10th APEC III Exchange.

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